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Legacy Of:

Roger  L.  Tewksbury

 

Personal Legacy
ROGER L. TEWKSBURY
World War II Diary

August 13, 1944 - Mission 1
Target: Bomb cross roads in the vicinity of Lisieux stopping the German retreat. Dropped bombs on three different IP's. The mission was very successful. Many German troops killed and high damage inflicted on the enemy equipment.

Bombing Alt. 20,000 ft. Bomb load: 52 100-lb. anti-personnel bombs. Gas load: 2,300 gal. Plane: B-24-J L 177 electric hydraulic pump burned out and No. 2 propeller governor stuck after hitting target; otherwise everything normal. Weather was good; visibility good and targets were visible. Flak was large caliber - fair amount and extremely accurate and persistent. Battle damage: Many flak holes in fuselage of ship, but no extreme damage. 506 lost one ship by a direct hit between No. 1 and No. 2 engine. Gas tanks caught fire and four fellows bailed out (later found that all bailed out safely). No enemy fighters seen. Had P-51s for escort.

August 14, 1944 - Mission 2
Target: Bomb ammunition dumps, hangars and runways of a major German airfield in southern France - Lyons. Results were very good. Our bombs hit runway and ammunition dumps. A large volume of black smoke was seen. The weather was very good over the target with good visibility.

Bombing altitude: 20,000 feet. Bomb load: 10 500-lb. Gas load: 2,700 gal. Topped off. Plane: B-24-J #177L - 8 hours flying time. Gas tanks dry on landing. Flak over target was not very accurate and about 88 mm. Battle damage: Flak hole in left vertical stabilizer. No. 1 engine air filter destroyed. Small hole in waist. Only ship to return with flak holes. No enemy fighters seen. Had P-51s clear into target and out.

August 15, 1944 - Mission 3
Target: Bomb a hangar near an airfield in Wilhelmshaven, Germany. Results were unable to be observed. RAF hit in the vicinity at the same time. Large columns of smoke seen in vicinity of Amsterdam. The weather was very good. Scattered clouds over Germany at about 3,000 ft.

Bombing altitude: 22,000 ft. Bomb load: 12 500-lb. Gas load: 2,500 gals. Plane: B-24-J, J-805. Very good ship, very fast. Bomb racks malfunctioned. 42-109805 "Gypsy Queen." 68th Sq. Flak: Fair amount of flak but very inaccurate. No battle damage. Fighters: No enemy fighters seen. Had P-51s and P-38s for escort in and out of target.

August 16, 1944 - Mission 4
Target: Bomb aircraft engine parts factory in Kothen, Germany. Bombing results were good. Plenty of smoke rising from target, some was from smoke screen. Very good visibility; target visible except for a few scattered clouds.

Bombing altitude: 22,000 ft. Bomb load: 10 500-lb. Gas load: 2,700 gal. Topped off. Plane: B-24-J P351. Very good ship. Had a bomb bay door hydraulic leak over target. First mission put on ship. New ship right from the states. No gas consumption known. (42-51351). Flak barrage over target not too close, but very heavy. As we left the enemy coast off to our left very little. Several rockets shot up but very inaccurate. Battle damage: none. Fighters: Enemy fighters reported over target, but saw none. P-51s and P-47s for escort in and out of enemy territory.

August 24, 1944 - Mission 5
Target: Bomb hangars believed to house aircraft around an airstrip near Hanover, Germany. It had been bombed before but showed no signs of reconstruction. Our squadron dropped bombs about two miles short or runway. Reason: someone got an itchy finger and dropped bombs too soon. Some of our bombs hit a railroad. The weather on takeoff was raining; a bit hazy over target. Otherwise good weather.

Bombing altitude: 22,000 ft. Bomb load: 6 500-lb. and 6 500-lb. clusters of incendiary bombs. Gas load: 2,700 gal. Not topped off. Plane: B-24-H Z not so good for speed, drawing 56 inches on takeoff. (42-95016Z "Down de Hatch.") Power setting all the way into target was 2400 RPM, 42 inches of manifold pressure in auto-rich. Saw flak a few miles inside Germany and it was heavy and very accurate after hitting IP. A few rockets were seen but one very near us. Battle damage: No. 2 engine hit in cylinder bank. Broke a rocker box causing a great oil leak clear from target back. Need new engine. Right tire hit by flak. Hydraulic leak in actuating cylinder on nose gear. Wiring in bomb bay cut up by flak. Antenna cut off, flaps full of holes. Wings and fuselage contained approximately 60 flak holes and scars. Had a slight vibration on grass turning around facing in the opposite direction of our landing. Plane would be out of commission about two weeks. Fighters: No enemy fighters seen or reported. P-47s and P-51s for escort.

August 27, 1944 - Mission 6
Target: Bomb an aircraft assembly plant and sub-depot located 15 miles north of Berlin proper, Germany. Because of weather, we turned back after going ten miles into Germany. No bombs were dropped. The weather was good over England and the North Sea, but clouds up to 30,000 feet over Germany and air rough.

Bombing altitude: 23,000 ft. Bomb load: 6 1,000 lb. Gas load: 2,700 gal. Topped off. Plane: B-24J C good ship, except sluggish on takeoff. Saw flak and rockets after hitting Germany, but none were very close. No battle damage. Fighters: No enemy fighters seen or reported. Had P-51s for escort.

September 5, 1944 - Mission 7
Target: Bomb railroad yards and repair shops at Karlsrule, Germany (had been bombed before). Results were that 506 bombs hit mile short of target, but upon leaving target area, two large columns of smoke were seen rising. The weather was very good; cloudy over the Channel and somewhat over France.

Bombing altitude: 25,000 ft. Bomb load: 12 500-lb. Gas load: 2,700 gal. Topped off. Plane: B-24J 0 (Consolidated Mess). Good ship (42-7568? Or 42-50535). Had poor lifting power at altitude, 25,000 ft. is about its ceiling load. No. 1 engine runs hot at over recommended power settings. No. 2 engine prop governor stuck and vacuum pump on No. 2 gave out after hitting target. Flak was heavy over target (155-mm stuff). Other groups were being shot at. Only three bursts hit near our ship. Only three bursts near our formation. Battle damage: Several flak holes in fuselage. Copilot's jack box hit and put out of commission. No. 2 engine inter-cooler hit making manifold pressure leak. Oil cooler also hit but no leak caused. No enemy fighters seen but were reported in the area. Had P-51s for escort.

September 11, 1944 - Mission 8
Target: Bomb a military tractor assembly plant in Hanover, Germany. Results were unobserved. Bombs dropped through the clouds but as we left the target, large columns of black smoke was seen rising from the city. The weather was very good. Scattered clouds over Germany and clouds over target.

Bombing altitude: 23,000 ft. Bomb load: 8 1,000-lb. Gas load: 2,400 gallons. Plane B-24J Q Good ship (44-40158). Had hydraulic leak in right forward bomb bay. No. 4 engine manifold pressure limited at altitude. Very good on gas. "Tinker Belle." Flak was heavy before we reached the target. Flak was sent up in barrages and also some tracking was done. No flak near us over target. Battle damage: Nose turret door put dent in right wing. No flak damage. Enemy fighters over target. A squadron ahead of us was hit hard. We had P-47s for escort into target and out.

September 12, 1944 - Mission 9
Target: Bomb oil refinery and supplies at Misbury, Germany located five miles from Hanover. Results: No reports on our own hits but large columns of smoke seen rising as we left. Had been bombed the day before with good results. The weather was very good. Target was visible. Some low clouds in places.

Bombing altitude: 23,000 ft. Bomb load: 24 250-lb. GP. Gas load: 2,700 gallon, not topped off. Plane: B-24-H Z 016 (42-95016 "Down De Hatch") fair; No. 2 engine started throwing oil out of bottom power section on takeoff and into target. No. 2 fuel pressure down to 7 to 10 lb. per sq. in at altitude all the way into target and out. No. 1 generator uncontrollable. No. 4 manifold pressure oscillated at altitude. 7.20 hr. flying time. 700 gallon left. Flak was large stuff put up as we hit enemy coast. None very close. Heavy barrage over target but none close. Battle damage: One large flak hole in leading edge of right wing between No. 3 engine and fuselage. Enemy fighters in air, but none seen. Had P-51s and P-41s and P-38s for escort in and out of target.

September 28, 1944 - Mission 10
Target: Bomb Panzer tank destroyer prime-mover factory at Kassel, Germany. This factory produces 100% of German army tanks. Results: No reports as yet, bombed PFF-heavy clouds over target. Weather was hazy at times. Cloud base as high as 15,000 ft. Heavy clouds over target.

Bombing altitude: 23,000 ft. Bomb load: 12 500-lb. clusters of oil incendiaries. Gas load: 2,700 gallon not topped off. Plane B-24H Z 016 runs very good. (42-95016 "Down De Hatch") No mechanical trouble. No flak near us but a good size barrage was sent up over target after bombs away and several rockets sent up. No battle damage. Fighters: Had P-47s for escort in and out of enemy territory. No enemy fighter action seen because our fighters went in and broke them up before we arrived.

October 7, 1944 - Mission 11
Target: Bomb tank works at Kassel, Germany. Results: Reports were very good on the hits. Several wings hit the same target at the same time with different bombs. Bombed PFF. Weather was hazy with scattered clouds at about 4,000 ft.

Bombing altitude: 23,000 ft. Bomb load: 12 500-lb. clusters of oil incendiaries. Gas load: 2,700 gallons not topped off. Plane: B-24J K 643 (42-52643) "Jose Carioco." Very good ship on gas consumption and low altitude fling. No mechanical trouble other than what was battled damaged. Heavy tracking flak as we hit enemy lines. Very accurate. Also heavy tracking flak on bomb run extremely accurate. Large number of rockets and smoke markers over target. Battle damage: No. 1 prop governor control wires shot out. Rudder trim tab control cable in waist cut off. Oxygen system in waist shot up. Had considerable amount of holes in waist and wing. (I rode left waist today). Enemy fighters seen by several crews. None hit us. Had P-47s for escort in and out of target.

October 17, 1944 - Mission 12
Target: Bomb chemical storage tanks of supposed war gases located several miles northeast of Cologne, Germany. Result: No bomb hits were observed because of heavy layers of clouds. Bombed PFF for marshalling yards in Cologne proper. Weather: Heavy clouds between 6,000 and 14,000 ft. during entire mission.

Bombing altitude: 23,500 ft. Bomb load: 5 500-lb. GP and 5 500-lb. incendiary clusters. Plane: B-24J T (523) (44-10523) (lost on October 30). Very good ship on gas consumption. No. 2 and No. 4 manifold pressure oscillate at altitude. (Fuel mixtures on all engines are set very lean). Flak was heavy caliber. Flak on bomb run and after bomb release but none very close. It was predicted flak and very few guns firing together. Large amount of smoke rockets sent up over target. Battle damage: Right horizontal stabilizer and de-icer foot hit by flak plus another hole through bomb bay door. No enemy fighters seen or reported. Had P-47s and P-51s for escort in and out of target.

November 29, 1944 - Mission 13
Target: Bomb an important railroad bridge at Altenburg (Paterborn), Germany. Bombs were dropped PFF through 9/10s cloud cover. Results were not seen but were expected to have been good. Weather was very good over England. 9/10s cloud cover over the target.

Bombing altitude: 21,000 ft. Bomb load: 7 1,000-lb. GP and 1 100-lb. smoke bomb. Plane: B-24J O 535 (42-50535). Very good ship on gas consumption. Fuel pressure on No. 2 engine oscillated at altitude. No. 2 engine turbo-amplifier fuse went out. Flak: small barrages were set up over important cities but only one burst hit near our formation. No battle damage. Had P-51 fighters for escort in and out of target. No enemy fighters seen.


December 10, 1944 - Mission 14
Target: Bomb railroad yards at Bingen, Germany. Didn't drop bombs because of bad weather. Fault of command pilot. Was within a minute and half of target. Weather was not so good. Clouds up to 22,000 ft. and temp. at about -45 degrees.

Bombing altitude: 22,000 ft. Bomb load: 44 100-lb. GP and 2 100-smoke bombs. Plane B-24J E+ a 66 ship. A good ship. Very little flak seen on IP and was very inaccurate but was large caliber stuff. No battle damage. Had P-51 fighters for escort in and out of target. No enemy fighters seen.

December 11, 1944 - Mission 15
Target: Bomb an important railroad and traffic bridge across the Rhine River just three miles form Karlsruhe, Germany. Results were reported to have hit target. Our first lead GH mission and was done under most difficult conditions. Our squadron only ones to hit target. Weather was not so good. Clouds up to and above 25,000 ft. Air was rough. Rain and snow in clouds.

Bombing altitude: 21,000 ft. Bomb load: 4 1,000-lb. GPs and 2 100-smoke bombs. Plane B-24J E. Very good ship. Good gas consumption. Little amount of flak and very inaccurate at target. No battle damage done. Had P51s and P47s for escort. No enemy fighters seen, but were reported in area.

December 29, 1944 - Mission 16
Target: bomb an important railroad bridge across the Rhine River near the town of Neuwied, Germany. It was to hinder the Nazi drive. Bombed visual. Bombs hit over target inside town. Weather was slightly hazy and 5/10 clouds.

Bombing altitude: 23,000 ft. Bomb load: 4 1,000-lb. GPs and 2 100-lb. smoke bombs. Plane B-24-J E #806 (42-50806). Very good ship on gas consumption. Bomb racks failed to release electrically . Large caliber flak; not too much but very accurate. Damage: Left-hand power bus bar hit and heavy stringer broke. Left elevator cut. Several holes in fuselage and wing. No. 3 engine hit in inter-cooler. No enemy fighters seen and had no close fighter support.

December 30, 1944 - Mission 17
Target: Bomb an important railroad junction at Altena, Germany. (group lead). No results observed because of 10/10s cloud cover but have expected to be good. Weather was foggy at base and 10/10s-cloud cover over continent.

Bombing altitude: 22,000 ft. Bomb load: 4 1,000-lb. GP and 2 100-lb. smoke bombs. Plane B-24J E+. #594. Very good ship. C-1 faulty. Flak: Only four bursts seen a mile ahead of us. No battle damage. No enemy fighters seen and had a few P-51s giving us area support.

January 3, 1945 - Mission 18
Target: Bomb a military barracks, supply depot and an ammunition dump at Landau, Germany. Results was unobserved. Bombed GH through 10/10s-cloud cover. Weather: 10/10s-cloud cover over continent.

Bombing altitude: 22,000 ft. Bomb load: 8 250-lb. GPs, 2 500-lb. incendiary clusters, and 2 100-lb. smoke bombs. Plane B-24J E+ #594. Very good ship. C-1 faulty. (42-51594). Flak: No flak; a few smoke rockets sent up. No battle damage. Fighters: No enemy fighters seen. Had four groups of P-51s for escort.

January 8, 1945 - Mission 19
Target: Bomb railroad junctions, which are very important to the German drive. Located at Burg Rowland, Belgium. Results: Bombed GH through 10/10s clouds. Unobserved. Weather: 10/10s-cloud cover over Germany.

Bombing altitude: 22,000 ft. Bomb load: 6 500-lb. GPs and 2 100-lb. smoke bombs. Plane: B-24J A (644). Fair ship. (42-50644). Oil pressure on No. 3 and No. 1 low. No. 2 turbo unsteady. Slightly high fuel consumption. No flak seen - only rockets. No battle damage. No enemy fighters seen. Had P-51s and P-47s for escort and area support.

January 13, 1945 - Mission 20
Target: Bomb railroad junction at Kaiserslautern, Germany. Bombed GH 9/10s cloud cover. Unobserved. Weather: Low ceilings 9/10s cloud cover and ground fog over continent.

Bomb altitude: 22,000 ft. Bomb load: 6 500-lb. GPs and 2 100-lb. smoke bombs. Plane (44-49322) B-24-L D (322). Pretty good all around ship. Fair gas consumption. Left bomb bay doors sticky at altitude. No. 4 prop faulty. First mission on plane. Flak: Very little in distance. No damage done. No enemy fighters seen. Had P-51s for escort.

February 14, 1945 - Mission 21
Target: Bomb railroads and factories in the center of Magdeburg, Germany. Results: Bombed H2X. Results expected to have been good. Weather was very cold. Dense con-trails and 9/10s cloud cover.

Bombing altitude: 26,000 ft. Bomb load: 6 500-lbs. GPs and 2 100-lb. smoke bombs. Plane B-24-J (A) 644 (42-50644). Fair performance on mission. Notable sluggishness at climbing. C-1 performed poorly. Had interphone trouble. Flak was heavy. Fair amount over target. Shot up different colored flak. No battle damage. Saw strange twin engine fighter. Had P-51s and P47s for escort.

February 25, 1945 - Mission 22
Target: Bomb rail yards at Aschaffenbury, Germany. Results: Bombing was visual; results excellent. Weather was excellent. No clouds below 30,000 ft.

Bombing altitude: 22,000 ft. Bomb load: 8 250-lb. GPs, 2 500-lb. incendiary clusters, and 2 100-lb. smoke bombs. Plane B-24-J 644 A (42-50644). Fair performance. 2,700 gas load. 9:20. C-1 faulty. Flak: a few bursts at 6 o'clock level, but in the distance. No battle damage. No enemy fighters seen. Had P-51s and P-47s for escort.


March 1, 1945 - Mission 23
Target: Bomb marshalling yards to Ingolstadt, Germany. Results: Bombed PFF. Results were unobserved. Weather: very low ceiling and 10/10s cloud cover.

Bombing altitude: 18,000 ft. Bomb load: 8 500-lb. GPs; 2 100-lb. smoke bombs. Plane B-24-L 525 E. (44-49525). Good all around ship except very high gas consumption. Had to crash land in northern France because of weather and low on gas. Falk: very little. None very accurate. No battle damage. Fighters: Had enemy fighters in area, but no attacks were made on us (ME262s jets). Had P-51s for escort.

March 3, 1945 - Mission 24
Target: Bomb oil refinery at Magdeburg, Germany. Results: Bombed visual. Excellent results. Weather: Visual with 5/10s-cloud cover over North Sea.

Bomb altitude: 22,000 ft. Bomb load: 8 500-lb. GPs and 2 100-lb. smoke bombs. Plane: B-24-J A 644 (42-50644). Right bomb bay door stuck. Manifold pressure on No. 3 engine oscillated. Otherwise was okay. Falk was very heavy and accurate. No battle damage. Fighters: Enemy fighters were shooting down ships around our formation and several passed through our formation (ME262s and ME163 jets). Had P-51s for escort.

March 12, 1945 - Mission 25
Target: Bomb rail yard and locomotive repair depot in Wetzlar, Germany. Results: Bombed GH. 10/10 cloud cover. Unobserved. Weather: 10/10s-cloud cover at about 6,000 ft.

Bombing altitude: 22,000 ft. Bomb load: 32 100-lb. GPs; 2 250-lbs. incendiary and 2 100-lb. smoke bombs. Plane: B-24-L C 323. (44-49323). Very good ship. No flak. Battle damage: Smoke bomb exploded in bomb bay spraying acid all over the ship. Waist gunner (Logan) had to bail out because of acid burns. No fighters.

March 19, 1945 - Mission 26
Target: Bomb an ME-262 assembly plant and adjoining airfield at Neuburg, Germany. Deputy lead. Results: Visual excellent results. Weather was slightly hazy but otherwise good.

Bombing altitude: 18,000 ft. Bomb load: 4 500-lb. GPs and 1 100-lb. smoke bomb. Gas load: 2,700 gallons topped off. Plane B-24-L D 322 (44-49322). Good ship. Good gas consumption. No flak. No battle damage. No enemy fighters seen. Had P51s for escort.

March 31, 1945 - Mission 27
Target: Bomb railroad yards and industries in Brunswick, Germany. Results: Bombed H2X. Results unobserved. Weather: 10/10s-cloud cover at about 4,000 ft.

Bombing altitude: 20,000 ft. Bomb load: 12 500-lb. GPs. Gas load: 2,600 gallons. Plane B-24-J O 535 (42-50535). Fair ship. Flak was heavy and accurate. Also, many rockets shot up. No battle damage. No enemy fighters seen. Had P-51s and P47s for escorts.


April 4, 1945 - Mission 28
Target: Bomb an air field northwest of Hamburg, Germany. Results: No bombs dropped because of 10/10-cloud cover. Weather: 10/10-cloud cover at 4,000 ft.

Bombing altitude: 20,000 ft. Bomb load: 20 100-lb. GPs. Gas load: 2,700 gallons. Plane: B-24-L D 322 (44-49322). Everything okay. Flak: Some in rear over coast. No damage. Had an enemy ME262 jet make a pass. Had P-51s and P47s for escort.

Altogether, we flew 30 missions, two of which I forgot to records.

On one mission, when passing over the Channel as the squadrons were test firing guns, a 50 caliber slug came up from below just missing the nose turret gunner and wrecking the left machine gun action. No one saw any planes below us at the time.

April 9 - Mission 29
Target: Leipheim.

April 25, 1945 - Mission 30
Last mission, Hallein, Aust.

*********************

ROGER L. TEWKSBURY
World War II
Memories and Biography

(Taken from a letter to Will Lundy)

April 17, 1988

Dear Will:

Since last hearing from you, I received a letter from Firman Mack who received my address from you. His wife answers his mail because of his failing eyesight. The next time I'm in his area, I plan to look him up.

My wife and I are going to England April 19th and returning April 29th. While there, I plan to visit Shipdham and Norwich. Our daughter is living in England so we're fortunate to have a guide and transportation provided.

Our crew flew a new B24 over the northern route to England. After the armistice, we flew a new B24 to the States via the northern route. This plane was one that had never seen combat and had been sitting idle in England. We had to lay over in Iceland repairing oil leaks in a couple of engines.

Gerrit Hessilink, radio operator, and myself as engineer, crewed a B24 which went on a sightseeing tour of Germany, especially the Rhine Valley. I couldn't get over the number of war prisons, which were located in large fenced in areas along the Rhine Valley.

We circled the damaged cathedral in Cologne at roof level. These flights gave the base ground personnel an opportunity to view what they helped to accomplish.

I have a list of our missions, targets, bomb loads, altitude, fighters, flak, battle damage, planes flew, etc. After a few missions we made lead crew and were never assigned a permanent plane; we were assigned a plane at the mission briefing.

Thank you for contacting me and the information you have sent.

Sincerely,

Roger Tewksbury, 506 Squadron
Engineer




ROGER L. TEWKSBURY
World War II
Memories and Biography

(Taken from a letter to Will Lundy)

4 Owen Drive
Littleton, NH 03561

11 December 1994

Dear Will:

In the spring of 1993, my wife and I visited our daughter and her husband who lived in England. They drove us to Shipdham, England, where I was stationed with the 506th Squadron during World War II. This was our second visit to Shipdham.

We were able to contact an English woman who lived there during the war. She did laundry for some of our troops who lived there during the war. She did laundry for some of our troops who were stationed at Shipdham at the time. She and her family drove us around to what is left of the old control tower (some of it is being restored) and my old barracks or I should say what is left of them. However, some of the drawings and paintings on the walls are still quite discernible. The farmer who owns the field now shoed us around taking us to what was once General Johnson's quarters. We noticed that some of the buildings have collapsed since the previous time we were there in 1988.

The English persons asked us if we knew or could find out any news or current addresses of the enclosed list of people whom they knew during the war. Having access to records, I thought you might be able to help in locating them.

We also visited the library in Norwich, England and found a copy of the 44th Logbook, volume 4, No. 3-winter 1992 which I don't have. Would it be possible for you to put me in touch with someone who might be able to obtain it for me together with the bill for same?

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Sincerely,

Roger L. Tewksbury

P.S. You might want to know for your records that Firman Mack, the pilot of our crew (506th) passed away.




Notes: Doctor Olaf Allison, Captain. Flying surgeon
1017 North Vermillion St., Danville, ILL
My mother used to do his laundry. One of his parents was Norwegian. Would like to hear from him.

Mrs. Valerie Hunt
1. Church Farm Cotts
Cranworth, Thetford, Norfolk 1P2575Q, England

Doctor George Becker was still around in 1981.
59 Stone Ledge, Pettsboro, NC 27312
This doctor used to come to my home when I was a few days old and feed me with an eyedropper. With his tender loving care, I'm still around today. Thanks to him.

Harry R. Snead, 1530 N. 54th St., Philadelphia, PA
68th Bomber Squadron
Won the DFC for raid on Polesti Oil Fields (age 20). At that time was living in Philadelphia. His father was in U.S. Navy during the war.
I Think Harry was a technical/sgt. Last address known by us: 3180 West 230, Cleveland, OH USA

Pershing G. Rolfe, 245 Center St., Canandiaque, NY
41 Saltonstoll St.
Canandiaqua, N.Y.
Friend of Mark and Martha. I have a photo of him. Was in 66th Squadron S/Sgt. Radio operator. Would like to know if he is still around. If so, would love to hear from him.

Jimmy Mifflin (waist gunner B24). 1133 N. 44 St., East St. Louis, Ill.
Shot down 26 February 1943. POW No. 42696
My mother used to write to him when he was a prisoner then all of sudden, no more letters. Would love to know if he got out alive.
The address my mother had was: Stalag Luft 3, Prisoner War Camp, Germany
My address is: Valerie Hunt, 1 Church Farm Cotts, Cranworth, Thetford, Norfolk 192575Q England.
 
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